Canadians say climate change a threat to Canada’s economic future and that Canada’s reputation has taken a hit on the global stage – CTV

Canadians see climate change as a threat to Canada’s economic future; support moving forward with climate change targets

Canadians agree or somewhat agree that the science behind climate change is irrefutable, and that climate change presents a threat to our economic future. They do believe that our previous efforts on climate change have harmed our reputation internationally, and generally support or somewhat support job losses in the oil industry in order to move forward with meeting environmental targets. Canadians are generally willing to pay more for products to help meet those commitments.

  • Climate’s threat to our economic future – Just under three quarters of Canadians (73%) either agree or somewhat agree that climate change represents a significant threat to our economic future (51% agree; 21% somewhat agree). Respondents in British Columbia were the most likely to agree or somewhat agree (82%). Just 16% either disagree or somewhat disagree (six percent disagree; 10% somewhat disagree) that climate change is a threat, while 10% said that they neither agree nor disagree that climate change is a threat.
  • The science of climate change – Just over seven in ten Canadians (72%) believe that the science of climate change is irrefutable, with half saying they agree (50%) and a little over one fifth saying they somewhat agree (22%) with that statement. Comparatively, only 17% said they either disagree or slightly disagree with that statement (10% disagree; eight percent somewhat disagree). Eight percent said they neither agree nor disagree that the science of climate change is irrefutable. Canadians in Atlantic Canada were the most likely to say the agree or somewhat agree (82%) that the science behind climate change is irrefutable, and participants in the Prairies were the least likely to say they agree or somewhat agree (58%) with the same statement.
  • Reputation damage from previous climate action – Just under seven in ten Canadians (69%) agree that Canada’s reputation on the global stage been hurt by our previous efforts on climate change (52% agree; 17% somewhat agree). Eighteen percent on Canadians either disagree or somewhat disagree that there was any reputation damage (11% disagree; seven percent somewhat disagree). Twelve percent said they neither agree nor disagree with that statement. Quebecers were most likely to agree or somewhat agree (81%) that Canada’s reputation had been damaged (61% agree; 20% somewhat agree), while those in the Prairies were the least likely to agree or somewhat agree (52%) to the same thing (35% agree; 17% somewhat agree).
  • Paying more to meet climate commitments – Just over three fifths of Canadians (63%) are willing to pay more for certain products in order to help Canada meet its environmental commitments, with (37% agree; 26% somewhat agree). However, just under a quarter of respondents either disagree or somewhat disagree that they would be willing to pay more (15% disagree; nine percent somewhat disagree). Twelve percent of Canadians neither agree nor disagree that they would be willing to pay more for certain products. Canadians  in Atlantic Canada  were most likely to agree to pay more, with almost three quarters (74%) saying they would agree or somewhat agree to pay more, compared to only half (50%) of Canadians in the Prairies who would say the same thing.
  • Moving forward with new targets – The majority of Canadians (66%) either support or somewhat support going forward with new climate change targets and processes even if the result is significant job loss in Canada’s oil patch (38% support; 28% somewhat support). Conversely, just under a third of Canadians (30%) would oppose or somewhat oppose the same thing (18% oppose; 12% somewhat oppose). Support for this plan is lowest among Canadians in the Prairies, where only 45% would agree or somewhat agree to move forward with new targets irrespective of job losses in the oil industry.

The full survey results can be found by visiting our website.

Methodology
Nanos conducted an RDD dual frame (land- and cell-lines) hybrid telephone and online random survey of 1,000 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, between November 21st and 24th, 2015 as part of an omnibus survey. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. The sample included both land- and cell-lines across Canada. The results were statistically checked and weighted by age and gender using the latest Census information and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada. Canadians without internet access or telephone lines were excluded by default.
Individuals randomly called using random digit dialling with a maximum of five call backs.

The margin of error for a random survey of 1,000 Canadians is ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Note: Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding.

 

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