Trudeau popularity strong but slides for first week in Nanos tracking (ending November 27, 2015)

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Nanos Weekly Leadership Tracking

Preferred Prime Minister – Asked who they would prefer as Prime Minister, Trudeau was the choice of 50.9% of Canadians followed by Ambrose/Harper at 16.3% (the four week rolling average is transitioning from Harper to Ambrose), Mulcair at 12.3%, May at 4.8% and 14.1% were unsure.

Qualities of a Good Political Leader – Nanos asks a series of independent questions for each federal party leader. Almost seven of ten Canadians (69.3%) said Trudeau had the qualities of a good political leader – a decline over the past week, 52.7% thought similarly of Mulcair while Ambrose/Harper scored 31.8% on this measure. Four of ten Canadians 40.7% thought May had the qualities of a good political leader.

The team at Nanos in conjunction with Klipfolio have launched our new live political data portal where you run the numbers you want and can explore the trends and data you need. This is part of our campaign, not only to provide the most reliable data to Canadians but to let them use it as they wish. We were the first to do nightly tracking and now we are the first research organization to post live public opinion data for Canadians.

We were the first to do nightly tracking and now we are the first research organization to post live public opinion data for Canadians. Here’s the link to check it out

To view the detailed tracking visit our website.

Methodology

The views of 1,000 respondents are compiled into a party power brand index for each party that goes from 0 to 100, where 0 means that the party has no brand power and 100 means it has maximum brand power. A score above 50 is an indication of brand power for the party and its leader at this time.

The important factors in this weekly tracking include the direction of the brand strength or weakness and also the brand power of one federal party relative to another.

The data is based on random telephone interviews with 1,000 Canadians, using a four week rolling average of 250 respondents each week, 18 years of age and over. The random sample of 1,000 respondents may be weighted by age and gender using the latest census information for Canada, and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada.

The interviews are compiled into a four week rolling average of 1,000 interviews where each week, the oldest group of 250 interviews is dropped and a new group of 250 interviews is added. The current wave of tracking is based on a four-week rolling average of 1,000 Canadians (250 per week) ending November 27th.

A random telephone survey of 1,000 Canadians is accurate 3.1 percentage points, plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

All references or use of this data must cite “Nanos Party Power Index” as the source.

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Canadians say climate change a threat to Canada’s economic future and that Canada’s reputation has taken a hit on the global stage – CTV

Canadians see climate change as a threat to Canada’s economic future; support moving forward with climate change targets

Canadians agree or somewhat agree that the science behind climate change is irrefutable, and that climate change presents a threat to our economic future. They do believe that our previous efforts on climate change have harmed our reputation internationally, and generally support or somewhat support job losses in the oil industry in order to move forward with meeting environmental targets. Canadians are generally willing to pay more for products to help meet those commitments.

  • Climate’s threat to our economic future – Just under three quarters of Canadians (73%) either agree or somewhat agree that climate change represents a significant threat to our economic future (51% agree; 21% somewhat agree). Respondents in British Columbia were the most likely to agree or somewhat agree (82%). Just 16% either disagree or somewhat disagree (six percent disagree; 10% somewhat disagree) that climate change is a threat, while 10% said that they neither agree nor disagree that climate change is a threat.
  • The science of climate change – Just over seven in ten Canadians (72%) believe that the science of climate change is irrefutable, with half saying they agree (50%) and a little over one fifth saying they somewhat agree (22%) with that statement. Comparatively, only 17% said they either disagree or slightly disagree with that statement (10% disagree; eight percent somewhat disagree). Eight percent said they neither agree nor disagree that the science of climate change is irrefutable. Canadians in Atlantic Canada were the most likely to say the agree or somewhat agree (82%) that the science behind climate change is irrefutable, and participants in the Prairies were the least likely to say they agree or somewhat agree (58%) with the same statement.
  • Reputation damage from previous climate action – Just under seven in ten Canadians (69%) agree that Canada’s reputation on the global stage been hurt by our previous efforts on climate change (52% agree; 17% somewhat agree). Eighteen percent on Canadians either disagree or somewhat disagree that there was any reputation damage (11% disagree; seven percent somewhat disagree). Twelve percent said they neither agree nor disagree with that statement. Quebecers were most likely to agree or somewhat agree (81%) that Canada’s reputation had been damaged (61% agree; 20% somewhat agree), while those in the Prairies were the least likely to agree or somewhat agree (52%) to the same thing (35% agree; 17% somewhat agree).
  • Paying more to meet climate commitments – Just over three fifths of Canadians (63%) are willing to pay more for certain products in order to help Canada meet its environmental commitments, with (37% agree; 26% somewhat agree). However, just under a quarter of respondents either disagree or somewhat disagree that they would be willing to pay more (15% disagree; nine percent somewhat disagree). Twelve percent of Canadians neither agree nor disagree that they would be willing to pay more for certain products. Canadians  in Atlantic Canada  were most likely to agree to pay more, with almost three quarters (74%) saying they would agree or somewhat agree to pay more, compared to only half (50%) of Canadians in the Prairies who would say the same thing.
  • Moving forward with new targets – The majority of Canadians (66%) either support or somewhat support going forward with new climate change targets and processes even if the result is significant job loss in Canada’s oil patch (38% support; 28% somewhat support). Conversely, just under a third of Canadians (30%) would oppose or somewhat oppose the same thing (18% oppose; 12% somewhat oppose). Support for this plan is lowest among Canadians in the Prairies, where only 45% would agree or somewhat agree to move forward with new targets irrespective of job losses in the oil industry.

The full survey results can be found by visiting our website.

Methodology
Nanos conducted an RDD dual frame (land- and cell-lines) hybrid telephone and online random survey of 1,000 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, between November 21st and 24th, 2015 as part of an omnibus survey. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. The sample included both land- and cell-lines across Canada. The results were statistically checked and weighted by age and gender using the latest Census information and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada. Canadians without internet access or telephone lines were excluded by default.
Individuals randomly called using random digit dialling with a maximum of five call backs.

The margin of error for a random survey of 1,000 Canadians is ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Note: Charts may not add up to 100 due to rounding.

 

Trudeau popularity hits new heights in Nanos tracking (ending November 20, 2015)

Nanos Weekly Leadership Tracking

  • Preferred Prime Minister – Asked who their preferred choice for Prime Minister was, 53.3% of Canadians said Trudeau – who continues to track upward following his election victory, followed by Harper/Ambrose at 17.2% (tracking includes two weeks for Harper and two for Ambrose), Mulcair at 11.6% (a new one year low), May at 4.6% and 12.1% were unsure.
  • Qualities of a Good Political Leader – Asked a series of independent questions for each leader, 72.0% of Canadians said Trudeau had the qualities of a good political leader followed by Mulcair who received 53.7% on this measure, May 39.1% and Ambrose/Harper at 37.2% of Canadians.

The team at Nanos in conjunction with Klipfolio have launched our new live political data portal where you run the numbers you want and can explore the trends and data you need.  This is part of our campaign, not only to provide the most reliable data to Canadians but to let them use it as they wish. We were the first to do nightly tracking and now we are the first research organization to post live public opinion data for Canadians.

We were the first to do nightly tracking and now we are the first research organization to post live public opinion data for Canadians. Here’s the link to check it out

To view the detailed tracking visit our website.

Methodology

The views of 1,000 respondents are compiled into a party power brand index for each party that goes from 0 to 100, where 0 means that the party has no brand power and 100 means it has maximum brand power. A score above 50 is an indication of brand power for the party and its leader at this time.

The important factors in this weekly tracking include the direction of the brand strength or weakness and also the brand power of one federal party relative to another.

The data is based on random telephone interviews with 1,000 Canadians, using a four week rolling average of 250 respondents each week, 18 years of age and over. The random sample of 1,000 respondents may be weighted by age and gender using the latest census information for Canada, and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada.

The interviews are compiled into a four week rolling average of 1,000 interviews where each week, the oldest group of 250 interviews is dropped and a new group of 250 interviews is added. The current wave of tracking is based on a four-week rolling average of 1,000 Canadians (250 per week) ending November 20th.

A random telephone survey of 1,000 Canadians is accurate 3.1 percentage points, plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

All references or use of this data must cite “Nanos Party Power Index” as the source.

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Two month positive run in Canadian consumer sentiment halts (released November 23, 2015)

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Bloomberg Nanos Weekly Consumer Confidence Tracking

After two months of climbing positive sentiment, the Bloomberg Nanos Canadian Consumer Confidence Index registered a decline in the weekly tracking.

“Of note, the tracking on perceptions on the forward strength of the Canadian economy dropped three percentage points in one week”, said Nanos Research Group Chairman Nik Nanos.

“Consumers might now be reacting to the prospect of a correction in the housing market, which would undoubtedly have an impact on households–although a varying one based on home ownership status. Owners have been considerably more optimistic than renters regarding pocketbook issues until just recently. During the oil-price crisis, however, owners have displayed lower expectations than renters, with the difference now at an all-time low,” said Robert Lawrie of Bloomberg Economics.

The BNCCI, a composite of a weekly measure of financial health and economic expectations, registered at 57.74 compared with last week’s 58.62. The twelve month high stands at 58.62.

The Bloomberg Nanos Pocketbook Index is based on survey responses to questions on personal finances and job security. This sub-indice was at 59.65 this week compared to 59.69 the previous week. The Bloomberg Nanos Expectations Index, based on surveys for the outlook for the economy and real estate prices, was at 55.83 this week (compared to 57.56 last week).

The average for the BNCCI since 2008 has been 56.76 with a low of 43.28 in December 2008 and a high of 62.92 in December 2009. The index has averaged 55.45 this year.

To view the weekly tracking visit our website.

Methodology

The BNCCI is produced by the Nanos Research Corporation, headquartered in Canada,  which operates in Canada and the United States.  The data is based on random telephone interviews with 1,000 Canadian consumers (land- and cell-lines), using a four week rolling average of 250 respondents each week, 18 years of age and over. The random sample of 1,000 respondents may be weighted by age and gender using the latest census information for Canada and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada. The interviews are compiled into a four week rolling average of 1,000 interviews where each week, the oldest group of 250 interviews is dropped and a new group of 250 interviews is added. The views of 1,000 respondents are compiled into a diffusion index from 0 to 100. A score of 50 on the diffusion index indicates that positive and negative views are a wash while scores above 50 suggest net positive views, while those below 50 suggest net negative views in terms of the economic mood of Canadians.

A random telephone survey of 1,000 consumers in Canada is accurate 3.1 percentage points, plus or minus, 19 times out of 20.

All references or use of this data must cite Bloomberg Nanos as the source.

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